Luke P.’s Sex Addiction

Luke P.’s Sex Addiction

Luke P. has made a splash on Hannah B.’s season of The Bachelorette, and Luke P’s sex addiction got people talking even more.

Although many viewers are certainly sick of him, Hannah and Luke had an undeniable connection at the beginning.  From kneeing Luke S. in the rugby game to failing to “stay in his lane,” Luke P. has unknowingly or not turned this season into the Luke P. show. Viewers of the reality TV series cannot stop talking about him on Twitter, and he certainly had more than his fair share of hate this season, especially after his confrontation with Hannah before the fantasy suite.

While the annoyance felt by lovers of The Bachelorette is valid due to many of the things he has said and done, Luke P. may deserve a little sympathy to some degree.

Is Luke P.’s Sex Addiction Real?

During hometown week of The Bachelorette, Luke talked about his many sexual escapades in college, his experimentation with harmful substances, and his alleged sex addiction. While Luke’s sex addiction claim may have had some viewers rolling their eyes at him once more, sex addiction is a real problem for some people.

In fact, the prevalence of sex addictions is surprisingly 3-6% of the American population.1 Not only is sex addiction real, but Luke P. also fits the typical demographics of a sex addict. Sex addictions are most common in men and usually start in their late teens or early twenties.2 Luke P. claims his sex addition started in college when he would have been in this age group. Sex addictions are also often comorbid disorders with mental health issues or substance abuse problems as well. Because of this, people with sex addiction often need mental health treatment as well. Luke’s claims about “experimenting like with drinking and partying and stuff” would support this theory as perhaps he was suffering from one of these other issues at the same time.

As viewers, we know little about Luke’s sex addiction problem other than that he was with a lot of girls in college, and one day he found God in the shower, which led him to stop. Sex addiction is a real disorder, but whether or not Luke P.’s sexual escapades qualify as sexual addiction is still up for debate for some people. He never mentions getting formal addiction treatment. He also makes it sound like he stopped immediately after his encounter with God. Could an addict quit so easily? How does someone determine when their need for sex turns into a sex addiction?

What Is a Sex Addiction?

Sexual addiction or Compulsive Sexual Behaviors Disorder is defined by compulsive and frequent sexual behavioral from an unhealthy sex drive that continues regardless of the negative consequences that it causes. Like a drug addiction, the addict can feel powerless to stop the addiction without help. Sex addiction can be chronic as well as intermittent. Satyriasis is the term for abnormal sexual desire in a male.

Luke P. isn’t alone. Many other celebrities have come out about their sexual addictions such as Lindsay Lohan, Tiger Woods, Russel Brand, Colin Farrell, and Rob Lowe. Some of these celebrities have even taken steps to get professional help. At Seaside Palm Beach, we are a luxury rehab center in South Florida that works with people in similar situations for various addiction problems such as substance abuse and sex addictions.

Perhaps Luke P.’s sex addiction is real, and he was telling the truth after all. Perhaps we will hear more on Bachelor in Paradise? One thing is for certain, addiction is a real problem. If you or someone you love is struggling with a sex addiction or substance abuse problem, do not be afraid to get help. Our luxury residential rehab in Palm Beach has everything you need to begin your journey to a happier and healthier life. To learn more about how we may be able to help you or your loved one, contact us today at 888-280-4763.

 

Sources

  1. Research Gate – Sex and Sexual Addiction in the United States of America: An Overview of Its Epidemiology, Management and Prevention Strategies
  2. NCBI – The epidemiology and phenomenology of compulsive sexual behavior.
  3. Europe’s Journal of Psychology – Sexual Compulsivity Comorbidity With Depression, Anxiety, and Substance Use in Students From Serbia and Bosnia and Herzegovina

* Image credit: Instagram

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